The word 'Art' is most commonly associated with pieces of work in a gallery or museum, whether it’s a painting from the Renaissance or a modern sculpture. However, there is so much more to art than what you see displayed in galleries.

The truth is, without being aware of it, we are surrounded by art and use it on a continual basis. Most people don’t realize how much of a role art plays in our lives and just how much we rely on art in all of its forms in our everyday lives.

The Joy of Art

You may be wondering why all of these things are so important to our daily lives and that you could probably survive just fine with essential items that were non-artistic. That is just the reason why art is so valuable! While art may not be vital to fulfill our basic needs, it does make life joyful. When you look at a painting or poster you’ve chosen to hang on your living room wall, you feel happy. The sculpture or figurines on the kitchen windowsill create a sense of joy. These varieties of art forms that we are surrounded by all come together to create the atmosphere that we want to live in.

Art and Music

The importance of art in our daily lives is very similar to that of music. Just like art, music can make life extremely joyful and can have a huge effect on our mood. In the workplace in particular, music is something that can help people set the mood for what they are about to do. If you have something hard or difficult to work on or are feeling tired, an energetic song will likely wake you up and add some enthusiasm to the situation. Similarly, when stress is high, many people find that relaxing to calming music is something that eases the mind.

Inspirational Art

Inspirational art, such as posters are often found in work spaces to encourage employees to continue being productive. There is now an increasing amount of companies using art in their offices, as well as playing background music, as it is proven to actually work in making end results far better quality. There may be a piece of art that you own that you personally find motivational. Perhaps a print with a positive affirmation or quote beautifully scrolled on it or a painting of a picturesque scene of where you aim to travel to one day.

SOME REASONS WHY ORIGINAL ART IN THE HOME IS AS IMPORTANT AS A BED

1. Creates Mood
2. Adds Personal Character to the Home
3. Makes Memories
4. Provides a Colour Palette
5. Makes a Room Feel Finished
6. Inspires and Fosters Creativity
7. Conversation Starter
8. Supports Artists
9. It is an Investment
10. Creates a Livable Environment
11. Keeps the Brain Active
12. Relaxation
13. Curating Your Own Gallery is Fun!

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Black Rabbit’s Ode to Timeless Architecture

January is all about new beginnings and seeking out those things that inspire us the most.

At House of Home we look to the design realm for examples of fantastic architecture and interior design. In doing so we came across this stunning project in the Adelaide Hills by Black Rabbit Architecture + Interiors. Besotted by this home, we reached out to chief architect Sean Humphries to learn more about his epic renovation. Here's what we discovered.

There is a certain poetry to the work of architect Sean Humphries and his team at award-winning Adelaide studio Black Rabbit Architecture + Interiors. So it was entirely appropriate that the brief for Number 6 Aldgate started with a haiku from its owners;

things of stone, wood, glass,
simple elements, combined
to create a home

In truth, the 70s ‘cream-bricker’ needed significant work to transform it from a cold, dark, mish mash of 70s and 80s infills and add-ons. It boasted faux Mediterranean render, terracotta tiled roof, gratuitous arches and a French provincial décor.

“Our aim was to reinvigorate a tired, ‘pokey’, poorly planned, and non-contextual building, and create a well-appointed, modern, family home which capitalised...


Black Rabbit’s Ode to Timeless Architecture

January is all about new beginnings and seeking out those things that inspire us the most.

At House of Home we look to the design realm for examples of fantastic architecture and interior design. In doing so we came across this stunning project in the Adelaide Hills by Black Rabbit Architecture + Interiors. Besotted by this home, we reached out to chief architect Sean Humphries to learn more about his epic renovation. Here's what we discovered.

There is a certain poetry to the work of architect Sean Humphries and his team at award-winning Adelaide studio Black Rabbit Architecture + Interiors. So it was entirely appropriate that the brief for Number 6 Aldgate started with a haiku from its owners;

things of stone, wood, glass,
simple elements, combined
to create a home

In truth, the 70s ‘cream-bricker’ needed significant work to transform it from a cold, dark, mish mash of 70s and 80s infills and add-ons. It boasted faux Mediterranean render, terracotta tiled roof, gratuitous arches and a French provincial décor.

“Our aim was to reinvigorate a tired, ‘pokey’, poorly planned, and non-contextual building, and create a well-appointed, modern, family home which capitalised on its spectacular surroundings. A home that would bring the light and outlook in to the house,” Sean explains.

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The strong relationship between architecture and interior design is critical to the way Black Rabbit works. “A tightly knit project team is integral to the success of any project. We design all our projects from the inside out and develop the interiors and the architecture simultaneously,” Sean explains.

So there is indeed a poetry in the way Black Rabbit created a harmony between landscape, external architecture and interior. Nestled in the Adelaide Hills the house was well sited and had ‘good bones’. Sean’s solution was to create strong lines, framed views and light and airy spaces.

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The transformation was extraordinary — the old home unrecognisable after its renovation. With strong, contemporary lines balanced with warm, tactile materiality, Aldgate is now a respectful ode to the classic forms of mid-century modern. As Sean muses, “it gestures to iconic forms from days gone by, with familiarity of homely materials punctuated by ‘blackness’, and affording the tired and gloomy original house a new lease on life”.

The external weatherboards, charcoal maxline cladding and raw concrete paving provide cues to 6 Aldgate’s rural context. New landscaping softens the exterior and helps the building to settle into its surrounds. Internally, the light and bright palette works to capture natural light while there is repetition in the dark 2-pack joinery ‘boxes’ which also echo the exterior.

American oak creates a gentle, rhythmic link throughout the spaces and natural textures such as the wool carpets provide a cosy, homeliness. “We deliberately diffused the lighting in the living space”, Sean explains. “This emphasises the room’s clean lines and allows a soft glow to gently bathe the space.”

Extending the existing central axis, Black Rabbit created a new living zone, which neatly separated the parent’s and children’s wings. A new entry, butlers pantry, laundry and powder room were concealed behind custom, dark, two-pack box-like joinery.

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To maximise spectacular views down through the valley, Sean stepped the floorplate through this new addition. “The sunken living room that looks down in to the valley below is my favourite aspect of the design,” Sean says.

There is something epic about the refurbishment of this home. It has both a familiarity and ‘newness’ to it which is welcoming and relaxing. And yet the scale and finish of this remodel ensures Aldgate is destined to become a timeless classic.

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We would like to thank Sean Humphries and Black Rabbit Architecture + Interior for inviting us to step inside this stunning home. Sean has won numerous awards including SA Architecture Award for Folding Rundle (2010), City of Adelaide Award or Folding Rundle (2010) and Emerging Architects Prize (2011). In 2017 Black Rabbit received two Architecture awards for Number 6 Aldgate.


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Project Credits:

The Project Team Design + Project Architect: Black Rabbit Architecture + Interiors: Sean Humphries - theblackrabbit.com.au

Interior Designer: Black Rabbit Architecture + Interiors: Bettina Hildebrandt

Landscape Designer: Mark Barnett Gardens: Mark Barnett

Builder: THUS: Michael Pipinias

Photography by: Aaron Citti


We would also like to thank our guest writer Kate Shaw for her work on this article.


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Read full article on houseofhome.com.au


How to Arrange Art

  • "People have a tendency to hang art too high," says Linda Crisolo, Art.com director of merchandising. "The center of the image should be at eye level." In living rooms, people are usually sitting, so artwork should be lower. A good way to ensure you're placing artwork at the right height is to hang it one hand width above the sofa.
  • A common problem when hanging artwork above a sofa or sideboard is that it's not in scale. Having pieces that are too small or too large will make the whole arrangement look strange. "Make sure artwork is at least two-thirds the size of the sofa or sideboard," Crisolo says. "For example, a 9-foot-long sofa should have a 6-foot-wide expanse of art above it."
  • In the bedroom, choose personal art, such as family photographs or your own photography. If you're arranging the pieces in groupings, Crisolo recommends sticking with one color theme, either all black-and-white or all color photographs.
  • "Above a mantel or fireplace is the perfect place to layer pieces," Crisolo says. "A house looks like a home when you can see layers of artwork and accessories."
  • In the kitchen, hang art in a place where it won't get damaged by water or heat. Consider placing art above an office space, near the dining table, or above open counter space. Crisolo also recommends avoiding kitchen art in the kitchen. "I tend to shy away from pictures of asparagus in the kitchen," she says. "Vintage art with traditional frames works in a traditional kitchen. In a modern kitchen, try bright colors with stainless-steel frames."
  • A symmetrical arrangement creates a striking and simple focal point. All-white frames and mats unify this grouping. "I like to use the same frames to create homogeny," says Crisolo.
  • When deciding where to hang images in your home, consider the wall space available and the arrangement of the room. "Use small pieces between windows and doors," Crisolo says. "If small items are in a space too large, the pieces look lost. With larger pieces, allow room for people to step back and admire the work."
  • Artwork collaborates with other accessories and decor to create a visual story. Make sure images, moldings, and shelves all work together. "Hang artwork in front of a bookcase, on the face of the shelf," Crisolo says. "The shelves and ledges become part of a decorating story."
  • Make sure your arrangement matches your decorating style. "Symmetrical arrangements are more traditional or formal. Asymmetrical is modern," Crisolo says. "Also look at the image and style of the frame. For cottage-style rooms, stick with vintage images or botanicals. In modern rooms, choose large and abstract pieces."