The word 'Art' is most commonly associated with pieces of work in a gallery or museum, whether it’s a painting from the Renaissance or a modern sculpture. However, there is so much more to art than what you see displayed in galleries.

The truth is, without being aware of it, we are surrounded by art and use it on a continual basis. Most people don’t realize how much of a role art plays in our lives and just how much we rely on art in all of its forms in our everyday lives.

The Joy of Art

You may be wondering why all of these things are so important to our daily lives and that you could probably survive just fine with essential items that were non-artistic. That is just the reason why art is so valuable! While art may not be vital to fulfill our basic needs, it does make life joyful. When you look at a painting or poster you’ve chosen to hang on your living room wall, you feel happy. The sculpture or figurines on the kitchen windowsill create a sense of joy. These varieties of art forms that we are surrounded by all come together to create the atmosphere that we want to live in.

Art and Music

The importance of art in our daily lives is very similar to that of music. Just like art, music can make life extremely joyful and can have a huge effect on our mood. In the workplace in particular, music is something that can help people set the mood for what they are about to do. If you have something hard or difficult to work on or are feeling tired, an energetic song will likely wake you up and add some enthusiasm to the situation. Similarly, when stress is high, many people find that relaxing to calming music is something that eases the mind.

Inspirational Art

Inspirational art, such as posters are often found in work spaces to encourage employees to continue being productive. There is now an increasing amount of companies using art in their offices, as well as playing background music, as it is proven to actually work in making end results far better quality. There may be a piece of art that you own that you personally find motivational. Perhaps a print with a positive affirmation or quote beautifully scrolled on it or a painting of a picturesque scene of where you aim to travel to one day.

SOME REASONS WHY ORIGINAL ART IN THE HOME IS AS IMPORTANT AS A BED

1. Creates Mood
2. Adds Personal Character to the Home
3. Makes Memories
4. Provides a Colour Palette
5. Makes a Room Feel Finished
6. Inspires and Fosters Creativity
7. Conversation Starter
8. Supports Artists
9. It is an Investment
10. Creates a Livable Environment
11. Keeps the Brain Active
12. Relaxation
13. Curating Your Own Gallery is Fun!

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Victorian Weatherboard Embraces Modern

Tucked away in Melbourne’s inner east, this double-fronted Victorian weatherboard home has undergone the most considerate of renovations and by doing so, created a beautiful sanctuary for its talented owners.

Interior Designer, Michelle Downing and her husband Tony Satter lived in the home for three years prior to renovating. Actually, Tony’s father bought this as the family home back in 1966 so, Tony’s known no other.

“Our land space was ideal for development and we loved the area. We had looked at moving, but weighed up the cost and it made more sense to invest money in our existing house and get exactly what we wanted,” commented Michelle.

rsz previous facade

Given the sentimental connection to the home, it’s no wonder that Michelle’s keen eye soon decided it was best to combine period grace with modern open plan living. As such, one of the first things Michelle and Tony did was to engage Sherbrooke Design and Construction to help make their vision a reality.

“This home was designed to maximise a relatively small 450 square metre block, as you set foot inside it is surprisingly spacious. Overall, the end result of this project is brilliant and it was great to work with Michelle...


Victorian Weatherboard Embraces Modern

Tucked away in Melbourne’s inner east, this double-fronted Victorian weatherboard home has undergone the most considerate of renovations and by doing so, created a beautiful sanctuary for its talented owners.

Interior Designer, Michelle Downing and her husband Tony Satter lived in the home for three years prior to renovating. Actually, Tony’s father bought this as the family home back in 1966 so, Tony’s known no other.

“Our land space was ideal for development and we loved the area. We had looked at moving, but weighed up the cost and it made more sense to invest money in our existing house and get exactly what we wanted,” commented Michelle.

rsz previous facade

Given the sentimental connection to the home, it’s no wonder that Michelle’s keen eye soon decided it was best to combine period grace with modern open plan living. As such, one of the first things Michelle and Tony did was to engage Sherbrooke Design and Construction to help make their vision a reality.

“This home was designed to maximise a relatively small 450 square metre block, as you set foot inside it is surprisingly spacious. Overall, the end result of this project is brilliant and it was great to work with Michelle as she added her creative flair to the interior. We were all very happy with the outcome,” commented Sherbrooke Director Robert Drechsel.

So, more on that spectacular design and interior.

From the street, the façade has had the most romantic of transformation. Gone are the off-white weatherworn cladding boards, old front door, tired roof, sage coloured window frames and exposed fence. In their place is a freshly painted new colour scheme using Dulux’s Quarry, Taihape and Whisper White, a new Monument coloured Colorbond roof, lovely period trims, an inviting front door and the perfect picket wooden fence with a gate guarded by traditional white roses and a box hedge. Interestingly, the second storey addition that consists of a retreat and a home theatre is not visible from the street view.

When you step through the front door you’re greeted by the traditional long hallway synonymous of this period home. Gorgeous oak timber floorboards contrast beautiful against the Resene Tea in quarter strength painted hallway walls and two statement pendant lights hang elegantly from the ceiling. It’s a beautifully welcoming, light space.

hallway and loungeroom

hallway and loungeroom after

Front Living Room

From there, unique features and furnishings can be found throughout the thoughtfully styled rooms.

A wonderful home office flooded with natural light, a master bedroom that has old world charm and sophistication with the clever use of rusted pressed metal printed wallpaper, a romantic chandelier and a guest bedroom that has the most wonderful fushion of pops of navy, yellow, red and fushia colours.

office

Guest Bedroom

rsz d661pine 05

Calcutta marble benchtops, in breathtaking slabs, are in the kitchen, bathroom and ensuite. A cluster of black pendant lights can be found hanging above the generous kitchen island bench and provide wonderful contrast and, importantly, task lighting. Likewise, a captivating rectangle pendant is expertly placed above the timber dining table.

rsz kitchen   before

rsz 1kitchen lounge   after

rsz kitchen   after

Bathroom   After

The spacious open plan living area leads out to an alfresco entertaining area that has ceiling heating panels and fans. Adjacent to this clever use of space is an inviting, sparkling, turquoise pool surrounded by landscaped garden beds. To top it all off, there’s even a rear double car garage that also provides off street parking and ample storage space.

rsz 2deck   after

Pool

“Would you believe me if I said we use to wedge a broken oven door shut with a broom while baking? And, on really cold days we’d even leave the oven door open for heating? That the toilet was an old outhouse in the backyard?!” asks Michelle. No – we can’t quite believe that and no wonder Tony is still in disbelief that their renovated home is the same home he grew up in!

So after such a transformation, what’s Michelle’s favourite room in the home?

“I love it all! My favourite room would have to be the front original living room with the bay window and fireplace. It's a quiet space for me and I reflect on the family memories there. It has such an emotional attachment,” comments Michelle fondly.

And, if Michelle could do it all again, would she do anything differently?

"Really the only thing I would change is I'd put in a larger Velux window over the kitchen but, I guess that's something we can still do! So no, I wouldn't change a thing", comments Michelle.

And, we can see why Michelle wouldn't change a thing as it looks absolutely perfect to us.

If you love Michelle's home as much as we do, the great news is you can get the look below.

Read More: Step Inside A Charmingly Chic Victorian Home Renovation

The House of Home Team would like to thank Michelle and Tony for allowing us to share their beautiful home with you and to Sherbrooke Design and Construction for the wonderful images and assistance.

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How to Arrange Art

  • "People have a tendency to hang art too high," says Linda Crisolo, Art.com director of merchandising. "The center of the image should be at eye level." In living rooms, people are usually sitting, so artwork should be lower. A good way to ensure you're placing artwork at the right height is to hang it one hand width above the sofa.
  • A common problem when hanging artwork above a sofa or sideboard is that it's not in scale. Having pieces that are too small or too large will make the whole arrangement look strange. "Make sure artwork is at least two-thirds the size of the sofa or sideboard," Crisolo says. "For example, a 9-foot-long sofa should have a 6-foot-wide expanse of art above it."
  • In the bedroom, choose personal art, such as family photographs or your own photography. If you're arranging the pieces in groupings, Crisolo recommends sticking with one color theme, either all black-and-white or all color photographs.
  • "Above a mantel or fireplace is the perfect place to layer pieces," Crisolo says. "A house looks like a home when you can see layers of artwork and accessories."
  • In the kitchen, hang art in a place where it won't get damaged by water or heat. Consider placing art above an office space, near the dining table, or above open counter space. Crisolo also recommends avoiding kitchen art in the kitchen. "I tend to shy away from pictures of asparagus in the kitchen," she says. "Vintage art with traditional frames works in a traditional kitchen. In a modern kitchen, try bright colors with stainless-steel frames."
  • A symmetrical arrangement creates a striking and simple focal point. All-white frames and mats unify this grouping. "I like to use the same frames to create homogeny," says Crisolo.
  • When deciding where to hang images in your home, consider the wall space available and the arrangement of the room. "Use small pieces between windows and doors," Crisolo says. "If small items are in a space too large, the pieces look lost. With larger pieces, allow room for people to step back and admire the work."
  • Artwork collaborates with other accessories and decor to create a visual story. Make sure images, moldings, and shelves all work together. "Hang artwork in front of a bookcase, on the face of the shelf," Crisolo says. "The shelves and ledges become part of a decorating story."
  • Make sure your arrangement matches your decorating style. "Symmetrical arrangements are more traditional or formal. Asymmetrical is modern," Crisolo says. "Also look at the image and style of the frame. For cottage-style rooms, stick with vintage images or botanicals. In modern rooms, choose large and abstract pieces."