The word 'Art' is most commonly associated with pieces of work in a gallery or museum, whether it’s a painting from the Renaissance or a modern sculpture. However, there is so much more to art than what you see displayed in galleries.

The truth is, without being aware of it, we are surrounded by art and use it on a continual basis. Most people don’t realize how much of a role art plays in our lives and just how much we rely on art in all of its forms in our everyday lives.

The Joy of Art

You may be wondering why all of these things are so important to our daily lives and that you could probably survive just fine with essential items that were non-artistic. That is just the reason why art is so valuable! While art may not be vital to fulfill our basic needs, it does make life joyful. When you look at a painting or poster you’ve chosen to hang on your living room wall, you feel happy. The sculpture or figurines on the kitchen windowsill create a sense of joy. These varieties of art forms that we are surrounded by all come together to create the atmosphere that we want to live in.

Art and Music

The importance of art in our daily lives is very similar to that of music. Just like art, music can make life extremely joyful and can have a huge effect on our mood. In the workplace in particular, music is something that can help people set the mood for what they are about to do. If you have something hard or difficult to work on or are feeling tired, an energetic song will likely wake you up and add some enthusiasm to the situation. Similarly, when stress is high, many people find that relaxing to calming music is something that eases the mind.

Inspirational Art

Inspirational art, such as posters are often found in work spaces to encourage employees to continue being productive. There is now an increasing amount of companies using art in their offices, as well as playing background music, as it is proven to actually work in making end results far better quality. There may be a piece of art that you own that you personally find motivational. Perhaps a print with a positive affirmation or quote beautifully scrolled on it or a painting of a picturesque scene of where you aim to travel to one day.

SOME REASONS WHY ORIGINAL ART IN THE HOME IS AS IMPORTANT AS A BED

1. Creates Mood
2. Adds Personal Character to the Home
3. Makes Memories
4. Provides a Colour Palette
5. Makes a Room Feel Finished
6. Inspires and Fosters Creativity
7. Conversation Starter
8. Supports Artists
9. It is an Investment
10. Creates a Livable Environment
11. Keeps the Brain Active
12. Relaxation
13. Curating Your Own Gallery is Fun!

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Australian Home Periods

Spanning a number of varying styles, Australia’s period architecture boasts distinctive designs that are full of character and charm.

Much of the residential architecture built in the early 1900’s owes its development to the prosperity of the gold rush era. However, period homes began evolving considerably from around the mid 1800’s.

Influenced by both English and American styles of architecture Australian period homes were shaped by the way of life and the economic climate of the time. From the steady advancement after World War II, to the California bungalow which reflects Hollywood’s influence on Australia, to the boom of the gold rush days, Australia has developed a richly eclectic urban landscape of houses that are innately beautiful.

From 1840 – 1980, we have researched extensively into the different types of period homes to bring you a guide to the top eight iconic styles that characterise Australia’s neighbourhoods today. Learn more about these styles below.

  • Victorian Era

  • Boom Town Era

  • Federation Era

  • Edwardian Era

  • Californian Bungalow Era

  • Art Deco Era

  • Contemporary Era

  • Brick Veneer Era

Australian Period Homes Victorian

Victorian Era Homes 1860-1880

Victoria era homes are often over 100 years...


Australian Home Periods

Spanning a number of varying styles, Australia’s period architecture boasts distinctive designs that are full of character and charm.

Much of the residential architecture built in the early 1900’s owes its development to the prosperity of the gold rush era. However, period homes began evolving considerably from around the mid 1800’s.

Influenced by both English and American styles of architecture Australian period homes were shaped by the way of life and the economic climate of the time. From the steady advancement after World War II, to the California bungalow which reflects Hollywood’s influence on Australia, to the boom of the gold rush days, Australia has developed a richly eclectic urban landscape of houses that are innately beautiful.

From 1840 – 1980, we have researched extensively into the different types of period homes to bring you a guide to the top eight iconic styles that characterise Australia’s neighbourhoods today. Learn more about these styles below.

  • Victorian Era

  • Boom Town Era

  • Federation Era

  • Edwardian Era

  • Californian Bungalow Era

  • Art Deco Era

  • Contemporary Era

  • Brick Veneer Era

Australian Period Homes Victorian

Victorian Era Homes 1860-1880

Victoria era homes are often over 100 years old and were built between 1840-1890 during the reign of Queen Victoria.

Simple elegance is the centre feature of these homes, making them timeless and still very appealing to this day.

Victorian style terrace houses are very common in suburban Melbourne and Sydney.

Some key features of Victorian Era Homes are:

  • Intricate stucco facades and verandas sporting cast iron lacework
  • Arched and double hung timber windows
  • Roofs made from slate or corrugated iron

For more inspiration check out our articles below which profile two beautiful Victorian home renovations.

Victorian Weatherboard Embraces Modern

A Chic Victorian Renovation

Australian Period Homes Boom Town Era

Boom Style Era 1875-1890

Boom style homes came to the forefront during the economic boom of the gold rush during the late 19th century.

These homes are noted for their intricate brickwork and lavish style and building became endowed with excess columns, balustrades and exaggerated entrances.

This style of housing is quite common in Melbourne, thanks to the gold rush era.

Some key features of Boom Style homes are:

  • Intricate Brickwork featuring complex patterns of different coloured bricks
  • Highly decorated facades and parapets featuring sculptures and intricate designs
  • The roof is often as well decorated as the walls, featuring slate tiles arranged in polychromatic patterns
  • Arched, double hung windows with elaborate decorations

Australian Period Homes Federation

Federation Era 1895-1915

These lavish home came about during Australia’s coming of age as a nation.

Federation Era homes are reminiscent of Old English Tudor style homes and also known as “Queen Anne Style”.

Carrying on the intricate style from the boom era, these homes often feature red brick and steep pitched roof with the occasional Tudor style weatherboard.

Some key features of Federation homes are:

  • Elaborate verandas which are integrated into the roof of the home
  • Asymmetrical design with multi-faceted roofs.
  • Victorian era homes often feature red bricks
  • Stucco chimneys topped off with a terracotta chimney pot
  • Timber framed windows with intricate leadlight
  • High ceilings with highly decorated plasterwork

Even in today's modern times, the Federation style has remained extremely popular and continues to flourish in Australia's new build homes.

Visit the article below to step inside a Federation style home.

MyState Bank - Annette's Story

Australian Period Homes Edwardian  2

Edwardian Era 1910-1915

Edwardian houses were built during the reign of King Edward and often come across as a toned down version of Federation Era homes.

Some key features of Edwardian homes are:

  • The home is often built with red brick or weatherboards
  • The roof is often made from slate or corrugated iron
  • The facade may often be decorate to emphasize the apex of the roof
  • Timber framed windows that may feature leadlight glass

Visit the article below to discover a home that beautifully blends a mix of Edwardian, Bunglow and Tudor style architecture.

Rich Glen Olive Estate.

Australian Period Homes Caifornian Bungalow

Californian Bungalow Era 1920-1930

A style that arrived from America during the 1920s, which became very popular.

These homes featured lower pitched roofs when compared to previous era homes and often featured thick columns beneath the veranda.

Some key features of Californian Bungalow homes are:

  • Low pitched roof
  • Veranda held upright by large, thick columns
  • Interior walls featuring stained plywood
  • Double hung windows with leadlight, similar to federation and Edwardian style homes

Visit the articles below to step inside a gorgeous Californian Bungalow or discover more about about the Californian Bungalow Style.

Take A Peak Inside A Renovated Californian Bungalow.

Californian Bungalow Style

Australian Period Homes Art Deco

Art Deco Era 1930-1950

Art Deco style was extremely forward thinking and modern at the time and are still quite striking to this day.

Architects aimed and creating something completely different from previous eras and used different materials and shapes to achieve a unique style.

Some key features of Art Deco homes are:

  • Weatherboard or brick walls to create a solid appearance
  • Rounded edges and occasionally symmetric and imposing designs
  • Hipped roofs and the use of terracotta tiles
  • Use of whites and creams

Discover a delight Deco home below or r learn about the Art Deco Interior Design Style below.

An Art Deco Delight In The Country

Art Deco Interior Design Style

Australian Period Homes Contemporary

Contemporary Era 1950-1960

Contemporary architecture hasn’t stood the test of time as well as previous eras and often looks very dated in the modern era.

These homes usually featured open plan interiors and featured brown and cream brick finishes with low pitched roofs.

Designs of the houses can be quite unusual and in a lot of ways are similar to the art deco style that preceded it.

Some key features of Contemporary homes are:

  • Low pitched roofs featuring corrugated iron or steel decking
  • Open plan interiors and low ceilings
  • Big windows often extending across entire front of the house
  • Cream, brown or light coloured bricks. Alternatively vertical weatherboards were also used.

Australian Period Homes Brick Veneer

Brick Veneer Era 1960-1980

This era of homes saw a step back from the ambitious designs of the Art Deco and Contemporary eras and ushered in the conservative and plain brick veneer, which was easy to build and relatively affordable.

It is not uncommon to see entire streets of very similar brick veneer homes.

Some key features of Brick Veneer homes are:

  • Homes often feature hipped roofs with simple concrete tiles often in bleak or low profile colours
  • Sliding timber framed windows
  • Very plain interior with timber flooring
  • Red, cream or white brick finishes

Australian Period Home Colours

Victorian Home Colours | Boom Town Home Colours

Australian Period Home   Colours 3

Australian Period Home   Colours 4

Australian Period Home   Colours 5

In Australia we are blessed to be surrounded by so many beautiful examples of period style architecture and landscapes that not only reflect our culture, but also remind us of our rich history and the important era's gone by.

If you would like to find beautiful period home style products click the button below.

Australian Period Homes


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How to Arrange Art

  • "People have a tendency to hang art too high," says Linda Crisolo, Art.com director of merchandising. "The center of the image should be at eye level." In living rooms, people are usually sitting, so artwork should be lower. A good way to ensure you're placing artwork at the right height is to hang it one hand width above the sofa.
  • A common problem when hanging artwork above a sofa or sideboard is that it's not in scale. Having pieces that are too small or too large will make the whole arrangement look strange. "Make sure artwork is at least two-thirds the size of the sofa or sideboard," Crisolo says. "For example, a 9-foot-long sofa should have a 6-foot-wide expanse of art above it."
  • In the bedroom, choose personal art, such as family photographs or your own photography. If you're arranging the pieces in groupings, Crisolo recommends sticking with one color theme, either all black-and-white or all color photographs.
  • "Above a mantel or fireplace is the perfect place to layer pieces," Crisolo says. "A house looks like a home when you can see layers of artwork and accessories."
  • In the kitchen, hang art in a place where it won't get damaged by water or heat. Consider placing art above an office space, near the dining table, or above open counter space. Crisolo also recommends avoiding kitchen art in the kitchen. "I tend to shy away from pictures of asparagus in the kitchen," she says. "Vintage art with traditional frames works in a traditional kitchen. In a modern kitchen, try bright colors with stainless-steel frames."
  • A symmetrical arrangement creates a striking and simple focal point. All-white frames and mats unify this grouping. "I like to use the same frames to create homogeny," says Crisolo.
  • When deciding where to hang images in your home, consider the wall space available and the arrangement of the room. "Use small pieces between windows and doors," Crisolo says. "If small items are in a space too large, the pieces look lost. With larger pieces, allow room for people to step back and admire the work."
  • Artwork collaborates with other accessories and decor to create a visual story. Make sure images, moldings, and shelves all work together. "Hang artwork in front of a bookcase, on the face of the shelf," Crisolo says. "The shelves and ledges become part of a decorating story."
  • Make sure your arrangement matches your decorating style. "Symmetrical arrangements are more traditional or formal. Asymmetrical is modern," Crisolo says. "Also look at the image and style of the frame. For cottage-style rooms, stick with vintage images or botanicals. In modern rooms, choose large and abstract pieces."